(Post Apocalyptic Sweater Vest #2)
(Unfortunately, it is Sweater 19, according to my mental catalog, because 17 and 18 are patchworks, and they are not all the way done or not all the way dry, respectively.)
POST APOCALYPTIC SWEATERVEST #2 is also the thing that makes me want to give up and just make an entire fall “collection” - or collection, rather, since I hate using ironic quotes but I am not really good enough at putting them together and can’t say it straight, so from here on I will call it the collection* - that is some sort of blatant, overt, carefully crafted extended Rasputina reference. (Would this be unforgivable gauche?) If this sounds twee retro-90s teenage girl to you when I say this, I assure you that you are mistaken, but my unabashed affection for Rasputina and why my brain is tying handmade clothes to sounds probably deserves a separate post in which I am not using “quotes” and very nearly explaining/justifying the music I like, both of which are unpleasant habits! 
Anyway, that’s Sweater 19. 

(Post Apocalyptic Sweater Vest #2)

(Unfortunately, it is Sweater 19, according to my mental catalog, because 17 and 18 are patchworks, and they are not all the way done or not all the way dry, respectively.)

POST APOCALYPTIC SWEATERVEST #2 is also the thing that makes me want to give up and just make an entire fall “collection” - or collection, rather, since I hate using ironic quotes but I am not really good enough at putting them together and can’t say it straight, so from here on I will call it the collection* - that is some sort of blatant, overt, carefully crafted extended Rasputina reference. (Would this be unforgivable gauche?) If this sounds twee retro-90s teenage girl to you when I say this, I assure you that you are mistaken, but my unabashed affection for Rasputina and why my brain is tying handmade clothes to sounds probably deserves a separate post in which I am not using “quotes” and very nearly explaining/justifying the music I like, both of which are unpleasant habits! 

Anyway, that’s Sweater 19. 

THIS SEEMS LIKE A SLOPPY WAY TO DO A REPLY BUT I AM DETERMINED TO TRY IT

scitchet said: Have you looked into making a cardboard (or sometimes called a shoe box) loom? They are cheap. Not sure about durable.

Thanks for the idea! I’ve actually been messing with a homemade kid-style loom I made from a bit of packing crate pallet, but it’s been making me frustrated & very aware of the limitations, mostly - the dimensions are a bit small, and I can’t control the tension and the beat(?) as well as I want to make the diversity of things I want (lofty scarf, sturdy but thin kitchen cloth, etc.) 

irrational reasonable

So I’m thinking that if I got a small loom now, it would be small, and useful, and I could make a move towards that little dream of a home mostly hand-furnished by making kitchen towels on it even though being settled enough for a big loom is a few years away, AND MOST IMPORTANTLY OF ALL, I could make a packet of hand-loomed linen kitchen towels for my brother, who is a scientist, who is setting up a real household for the first time really, and who deserves durable handmade closewoven tea-towels to use during all those vital bread-baking stages where you have to let the dough rise under a cover, and who above all of that is probably the best combination of traits of anyone I give handmade things to as gifts on anything like a regular basis, as he seems to value the work while still putting things to Everyday Use. 

CONS:

  • Even little baby toy looms are kind of expensive
  • I am trying to knit sweaters! It is a bad time to do loom things, given that I would probably get all fascinated by it and want to spend all of my time figuring out how to do it. 

ADDITIONAL CONS:

  • I already have yarn planned out - a handspun blend - for a perfect beautiful woven scarf, and I am personally of great faith that I could master the basic weave I want by mid-September, and it would be so gorgeous, and besides I am pretty sure that one of my main infatuations with design (and the key to my non-success!) is that I want to make things; I want to learn all these different ways of making things; I want to get an idea in my head like a watercolor-looking plainweave scarf and learn the techniques I need to make it real all by myself instead of shopping it out; I can’t understand how you could be happy shopping it out, and don’t wholly grasp how really famous fashion designers manage not to die of frustration since mostly other people are doing all the sewing. Anyway. 

I really do have this big complicated notion that it would be very good to have a room in your home where all of the soft furnishings are handmade, and that this would be manageable, and that delicate-durable design aesthetic could then potentially spread from that room to others until everything had that beatufiul personal wabi-sabi quality in it. I don’t know if that justifies a loom, though.

Another super-soft merino, hand-dyed wool handspun by me. This looked forgettable in the wool, but was beautiful to spin, and I like the stripes - the combination of rich tigereye colors and yet the neutral/masculine wearability. Color, and nice color, but not too much. ANYWAY IT’S GONNA BE A HAT I AM SO PROUD.

Another super-soft merino, hand-dyed wool handspun by me. This looked forgettable in the wool, but was beautiful to spin, and I like the stripes - the combination of rich tigereye colors and yet the neutral/masculine wearability. Color, and nice color, but not too much. ANYWAY IT’S GONNA BE A HAT I AM SO PROUD.